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Delray Beach Morphine Outpatient Treatment

What Is Morphine?

Morphine Outpatient Treatment Delray BeachMorphine is a powerful derivative of opium, a drug extracted from the poppy plant. It is primarily used in hospital settings to treat severe pain. Only four countries—Australia, France, Spain, and Turkey—are legally authorized to grow poppy plants for medicinal use.

While morphine was originally extracted and used in its pure form from opium, today doctors use semi-synthetic versions. Morphine comes in several forms, including extended-release tablets and capsules, syrups, injections, and suppositories. People who abuse morphine sometimes also smoke or snort it.

Morphine is generally only prescribed to people who have severe, long-term, or chronic pain—such as cancer-related pain, pain after surgery, or pain after a heart attack. But it is commonly abused and sold as a street drug. And, like other opioid drugs, morphine can be very addictive.

Commonly abused name-brand drugs containing morphine include:

  • Avinza®
  • MorphaBond®
  • Kadian®
  • MS Contin®
  • Oramorph®

 

How Morphine Affects the Brain & Nervous System

Morphine is an opioid drug that attaches to nerve receptors in the brain, sending signals that trigger the release of dopamine and block pain. In addition to feelings of euphoria and relaxation, morphine can produce the following side effects:

  • Impaired motor coordination
  • Decreased appetite
  • Constipation
  • Irregular menstrual periods
  • Reduced libido

Because morphine acts on many places in the brain and nervous system, it can slow breathing and suppress the immune system, which can have dangerous consequences. Morphine addiction can seriously damage a person’s health over time and put them at high risk of death from overdose.1

 

Opioid Abuse Statistics

Because of its potency and the way it impacts the brain’s reward system, morphine carries a high risk of both physical dependency and addiction (compulsive drug use). Unfortunately, addiction and overdose deaths from morphine and other opioid drugs are common. Consider the following:

  • Each day 116 people die in the U.S. from opioid-related drug overdoses.2
  • In 2015, more than 12,700 people in the U.S. died from drug overdoses involving natural and semi-synthetic opioids like morphine and oxycodone.3
  • In 2016, more than 11 million Americans misused prescription opioids, including morphine.2

 

Help for Morphine Addiction

Morphine detox often requires round-the-clock oversight from a team of qualified medical professionals, as some people are at increased risk for stroke, heart attack, and even death during the detox process.

Morphine withdrawal symptoms can be uncomfortable and sometimes painful. The following symptoms are common:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Chills and sweats
  • Fatigue
  • Restlessness
  • Severe irritability

Methadone—a synthetic drug used as a substitute for morphine under careful medical supervision—is sometimes used to help ease morphine withdrawal symptoms.

 

World-Class Treatment for Morphine Addiction

If you or a loved one is struggling with morphine addiction, RECO Intensive can help. We’ve helped hundreds of men and women safely detox from morphine and begin a new path forward. We tailor our Delray Beach morphine outpatient treatment program to the individual needs of our clients, taking into consideration each person’s physical, emotional, and spiritual needs.

Morphine recovery is possible at our state-of-the-art Delray Beach rehab center, staffed by a dynamic team of empathic, skilled medical professionals and counselors. Located in beautiful Delray Beach, Florida, our facilities provide the ideal setting for healing and wellness.

Treatment for morphine addiction is a phone call away—get in touch with an admissions specialist today at 561.808.7986 to learn more about our detox and outpatient programs or use our contact form to send us a message.

Healing begins at RECO Intensive.

 

Sources:

  1. https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2008/06/morphine-induced-immunosuppression-brain-to-spleen
  2. https://www.hhs.gov/opioids/about-the-epidemic/index.html
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/pubs/2017-cdc-drug-surveillance-report.pdf